• Sylvie Marie

Harrison Country - 'Climate Change'


Americana group, Harrison Country consists of Don and Karen Harrison and their daughters Amy Harrison and Jennie Harrison Young and Lexi White. On their debut album, ‘Climate Change’, they are backed by Maryland legend Bryan Ewald (guitars, bass, mandolin, keyboards), Josh Chapman (bass), Brandon Bartlett (drums), Brad Kimes (drums), Larry Byrne (keyboards, bass, sax) and Aidan Ewald (drums). The album credits Bryan Ewald and Alexandra White for the arrangements. The musicianship and composition are diverse and distinctive complimenting the Harrison’s rich vocals and mesmerizing harmonies. ‘Climate Change’ is a 12 song CD that thoroughly explores the art of Americana.

The CD opens with the toe-tapping, bluesy track titled “Men in the House.” Commencing with a slick guitar riff and sparsely strummed chords, the vocals begin center stage. With a clear, radio-ready tone, the lead singer takes you straight into the story: “Well it was Saturday night and me and my sisters were scouting the town for some good time misters.“ The song goes on to describe the “slim pickin's’” the women find at the joint: the Peter Pans, Cowboys, Divas and Dudes. “Ain’t there a man in the house?” There’s a nice touch of humor in this song that struts its stuff with great fun, but make no mistake--fun does not mean simple. This upbeat song is musically top-notch presenting stellar guitar work and a tight rhythm section. The vocals are strong and the lyrics are clever and well-written. This is a great first track for the album. .

The title track “Climate Change” is a rocking song about a relationship that’ has gone from hot to cold when she discovers her man isn’t where he says he is. This song demonstrates the group’s versatility. With keys and guitar, the bands pulls off a fun 50’s rock and roll vibe with a modern country twist. Laced with nice sax and guitar solos, “Climate Change” has a big, full sound that will surely get folks onto the dance floor.

Great story telling is at the heart of the American gem "Sahdow Games." This song takes us back to a time long ago when his “Grandfather lost his right arm, just shy of seventeen, his brother killed a horse to bring a doctor to the scene.” Then asks the question, “How did it feel, when ruin was near and real? What would he say, if he were here today to see the shadow games his grown-up children play?” With great harmonies and fantastic guitar acrobatics that weave their way through the melodies, "Shadow Games" moves forward with just the right amount of musical tension for a gripping and engaging musical tale.

“Like A Ghost” is about being haunted by a relationship that has disappeared like a ghost. The beginning has some wonderful ambiance setting a mysterious mood. The lead vocalist walks us through some scenarios in which he recounts all the things he has heard about his lost love including where she might be, what she might be doing, and who she might be with. At every turn, he is reminded of her. He goes on to list the promises she didn’t keep. The song is sung very convincingly with emotion leaving a lasting impression. These four songs are not the only noteworthy ones; all 12 tracks are superior. Kudos to Harrison County for painting musical Americana stories like true artists – these are not ever paint-by-the-numbers songs. Every palette, from the arrangements to the instrumental talent, and from the lyrics to the vocal interpretations and harmonies, is original, imaginative and musical, but this never stops the songs from being catchy and easily-relatable. Harrison Country presents a thoroughly thoughtful and interesting album full of the stuff that great Americana is made of. From heartfelt ballads to upbeat, clever dance hall tunes, the story telling and composition sung by amazing voices will grab hold of you. The musicians are second-to-none and listeners of all genres will love the tasteful guitar, sax, keys and mandolin solos as well as their in-the-pocket rhythmic sensibilities. To learn more about the Harrison County, visit them at their website.

#HarrisonCountry #ClimateChange #IndependentMusicReviews